ii. Faculty & Student Dynamics

Which of the following statements best describes how you are recognized by faculty when you engage in group projects?

34% My work and ideas are recognized by faculty as my own.
48% My work and ideas are somewhat recognized by faculty as my own.
13% My work and ideas are rarely recognized by faculty as my own.
5% My work and ideas are not recognized by faculty as my own.

White

40% My work and ideas are recognized by faculty as my own.

Bipoc

31% My work and ideas are recognized by faculty as my own.

White

13% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

Bipoc

21% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

White

13% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

Bipoc

21% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

US

28% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

international Intl

18% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

White

13% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

Bipoc

21% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

Female

11% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

Female

29% My work and ideas are not recognized or rarely recognized by faculty as my own.

White

“Group projects were extremely challenging during remote learning. I felt more heard and acknowledged during in-person group projects. For remote work, it was easy for teammates who didn’t participate as much to breeze by without the professors realizing that the work balance was off.”
—US Female

BIPOC

“Faculty definitely have a bias towards individuals in group projects. In all of my group projects this past year, my white groupmates were greatly favored over me, and I lost motivation to participate given that my efforts would usually not receive feedback or acknowledgement.”
—US Asian Male

“I found it especially regrettable when faculty were not able to recognize or acknowledge the background work of students in group projects. Instead, there was a pattern of focusing on the most vocal or ostensibly ambitious individual, who would often absorb others’ contributions only to later put their own efforts above the rest, or present everyone’s work in a vague manner that seems to claim it as their own. Faculty should be able to identify and preclude such dynamics, as it’s often only the professor’s response that is capable of validating or annulling such rapacious behavior.”
—US Latinx Male

“Professors did everything in their power to adjust to the situation. It was amazing how all the ones I encountered gave extra time and attention to make up for the fact that we were not in-person. Students, on the other hand, might have been facing more difficult circumstances and did not engage with classes in the same way as in-person. People would not participate and often turned their cameras off, which made seminars and studios extremely unproductive.”
—International Latinx Male

In your experience, to what extent is the respect with which faculty treats a student’s thoughts and contributions affected by the student’s ethnicity and/or gender?
not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.24

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.40

white

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.15

bipoc

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.24

white

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.15

bipoc

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.73

male

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.21

female

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.33

male

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.07

female

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.07

us

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.43

international Intl

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.07

us

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.43

international Intl

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

2.74

bipoc

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.37

bipoc

White

“I perceive the greatest disparity of attention and consideration from faculty between native English speakers and ESL students--particularly Asian students. Faculty don’t always seem to go the extra mile to bridge communication gaps, not limited to language differences but fundamental cultural differences as well. This felt way more obvious to me over Zoom where I could listen in on other desk crits and see more clearly beyond my own personal relationship with a professor.”
—US Female

“[The classroom is] dominated by outspoken students with similar cultural or educational backgrounds as faculty. Does not feel like a truly international school and can make the school feel like a favorites contest instead of a meritocracy.”
—US Male

BIPOC

“After going remote, most faculty and critics were more empathetic & flexible than ever before. Some critics were extra mindful to issues like race and gender and treated everyone as fairly as possible. There were a few exceptions, however, who showed clear differences in teaching style & attitude towards certain personalities that are associated with certain races and genders.”
—International Asian Female

“When working on a [student] exhibition in regards to anti-AAPI violence in the North Gallery, we were told by the school’s exhibition staff to ALWAYS work around the design and schedule of the [adjacent, main gallery] exhibition ["Room(s): Yale School of Architecture Graduate Women Alums 1942-"] because our exhibition was not as important.”
—International Asian Female

“In my experience, I feel that students are treated quite fairly in class and are treated with equal amounts of attention.”
—International Asian Male

“I’ve been lucky to have had very little negative experience within the classroom setting. Race and gender have never come up as factors in the way faculty in the courses I have taken have addressed students. That being said, I tend to take courses that are taught by faculty that do not have a ’reputation’ for such behavior.”
—US Biracial Female

In your experience, to what extent is the feedback a student receives during pin ups and reviews affected by the student’s ethnicity and/or gender?
not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.37

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.48

white

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.31

bipoc

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.48

white

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.31

bipoc

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.00

us

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.47

international Intl

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.21

us

not at all affected 5
4
3
2 extremely affected 1

3.53

international Intl

White

“I’ve witnessed many moments where certain professors spoke down to peers based on their race, gender, or mental health status. There are a few amazing professors who never did this, but it’s hard to forget the negative moments (which definitely weren’t rare).”
—US Female

BIPOC

“I felt sometimes critics were trying to be careful about what they said, especially when students brought materials that were highly related to their cultural backgrounds...which to me sometimes made [critics] withdraw from giving honest criticism of the actual work.”
—International Asian Male

In your experience, which of the following best describes how teaching was adapted to remote learning?

13% Critics and faculty adjusted their teaching methods substantially.
64% Critics and faculty somewhat adjusted their teaching methods.
17% Critics and faculty adjusted their teaching methods upon request.
6% Critics and faculty did not adjust their teaching methods.

white

14% Critics and faculty did not adjust their teaching methods.

bipoc

2% Critics and faculty did not adjust their teaching methods.

White

“Some [faculty members] are the most considerate and accommodating to everyone’s background and identity. There are some faculty who take a different tone, specifically towards non-native English speakers. Although I don’t believe there is any ill-intent, I have seen a number of reviews and classroom dialogues that could have been handled better to say the least. Regarding adjustment to Zoom, most faculty made minimal changes to their course structure. But as far as I can tell, they did not have the support from the school that they needed. Especially some of the older professors when it came to technology.”
—US Male

“The divide between students who felt comfortable voicing opinions and those who did not was even more intense than it would have been in person. I wish faculty had made use of facilitation methods—popcorn, circle sharing, paired conversations, encouraging use of the chat and Raise Hand functions, stack, etc.—to address this obvious problem.”
—US Female

BIPOC

“I feel for international students who could ~only~ get office hours or do student group meetings at absurd hours (like 2-6am their local time). I felt like my personal specific circumstances were not ever truly considered at any point, and were instead shoved into the admin's generalized idea of our circumstances as a whole.”
—US Asian Male

“It was a constant struggle to remind everyone that there was a time difference. Everything was upon request, and such requests were often forgotten. Asking for a change every time made me feel bad about being the only one to do so.”
—International Asian Female

“Answering "Critics and faculty adjusted their teaching methods substantially."" I just want to add that changing substantially wasn’t always great. Some seminars felt half-assed.... I really think that is a result of digital learning...where [classes] basically reverted to guest lecturers most every class with little discussion time.

I do have to give a huge shout out to Turner Brooks for having his Drawing Projects seminar in-person (optional). It definitely fueled a more inclusive learning experience and motivated us to create awesome projects.”
—US Biracial Female

“In general, they were very understanding in adjusting their availability. Personally, I felt that when flexibility was taken to the extreme (pre-recorded classes, optional classes, etc.) it was actually harder for me to learn because of the lack of a strict structure.”
—International Asian Male

“This year was better than I expected but feel bad that I missed lots of opportunities and resources the school provided.”
—International Asian Female

“Every meeting with your studio critic felt like a presentation, rather than a conversation.”
—International Asian Female

“There were some profs that were happy to speak further and meet after class, so that was amazing. But the others would ignore emails and even omit evaluations, as if we never took the class.”
—International Asian Male

In your opinion, YSoA’s process of enrolling in elective courses is:

44% Somewhat fair or fair
32% Neither fair nor unfair
24% Somewhat unfair or unfair

White

24% Somewhat unfair or unfair

Bipoc

25% Somewhat unfair or unfair

White

24% Somewhat unfair or unfair

Bipoc

25% Somewhat unfair or unfair

us

42% Somewhat unfair or unfair

international Intl

15% Somewhat unfair or unfair

White

“The elective enrollment seems fair, I have no qualms with the process. I do not fully understand the Studio lottery process, however.”
—US Male

BIPOC

“We shouldn’t have to fight to take the courses we came to YSoA for.”
—US Black Male

“Between attending multiple lectures and crafting statements of interest, the elective enrollment process is surprisingly laborious. I do quite like that both students and instructors have a say in who is enrolled in which class though.

I think the awarding of teaching assistantships and administrative assistantships should be reconsidered as well, especially for first year students. While teaching fellowships pay the most, the other student jobs offered by YSoA can also provide meaningful ways to connect with faculty and develop skills.It also felt like securing student jobs (both inside and outside of YSoA) was especially difficult for remote students this year.”
—International Asian Male